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We reserved one day in Edinburgh to get out of the city, which I’m SO glad we did. The Scottish countryside was absolutely breathtaking, and it was such a joy to be driving through it. We used this company, recommended to us by a friend, and highly enjoyed it. Of course there were times I wished we were on our own schedule, but in exchange for that we really saw a lot. I’ve listed a few of my favorite below!

Yellow fields: The hills were dotted with wide fields of bright yellow–our driver said it was rapeseed, which is canola to us Americans. I LOVED those pops of color. We never found ourselves right next to it and outside the bus, so all I have are blurry photos of it, but I still loved it.

Forth Bridge: Just north of Edinburgh is the Firth of Forth. (A firth is the Scottish word for an inlet or fjord.) Across that water is the old Kingdom of Fife. Put all that together and you get to say that you’re crossing “the Firth of Forth to Fife.” Which is just fun in your mouth. The bridge opened in 1890, has never had to be repaired, and is still used for trains. Gorgeous!

Ancient Celtic Worship Site: Our tour guide knew where to find this secret special place, and pulled down a small country road to let us take a glimpse. This is an ancient pagan worship place, which is still used today. Next to the old staircase we found Celtic carvings, and the tree stump holds offerings of people who’ve come to pay respects.

St Andrews: Our main destination for the day was the university town of St. Andrews, famous for being the birthplace of golf, and for being the place where Will met Kate. (Aww.) I actually felt kind of guilty for being in the birthplace of golf, since I’ve never been in the least bit interested, but members of my family are crazy about it! Do I buy them postcards, or is that just rude? “I’m here and you’re not, and I’m not even enjoying it like you would!” We dutifully took some photos and peeked inside the golf museum.

My favorite part of St. Andrews was the ruins of the old cathedral, which stand empty and open, grass growing in between.

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